Everybody and every ‘thing’ needs love. Not just when they’re down, or when you see they’re down, or when they’re unhealthy – but on a daily basis. Just as an infant will die without human contact, so do we all need to feel engaged with each other, included in our communities and social environments, loved by those important to us, thrilled by the relationships we share, and full of love ourselves.
Morgan Freeman
Pierre qui roule n’amasse pas mousse
A rolling stone does not gather moss - Xavier

Beautiful day at the farm with my bestie seeing her thrive in her new position as livestock coordinator at the a Rodale Institute

Son, It’s Okay If You Don’t Get Laid Tonight

angieup:

image

Hey kid. You’re at an age where I’m pretty sure you’re about to have sex soon, or actually, you might even already be having it and you’re just *that* good at keeping it from me. I don’t really fret over that because I trust you. And because I trust myself and the job I’ve done as your…

Oh, the Places You’ll Go at Burning Man

I suppose not, but I am going to make darn sure the world isn’t going to change me. It’s like this. Imagine a big sea saw and one end is on the ground, because it has a basket half full of rocks in it. The other end is up in the air, because it has a basket one-quarter full of sand. And some of us got teaspoons and we are trying to fill it. And of course most people are kinda scoffing at us. They say, “Don’t you see it’s leaking just as quick as you are putting it in? People like you been trying for centuries, but it’s never going to change.” And we say, “You might be right, but we think we get more people with teaspoons all the time and one of these days that whole seasaw is going to go zooop, and people will say ‘Gee, how did it happen so suddenly?’ Us and all our little teaspoons, over the centuries.” Who knows? /Starts singing/ And so we keep on, while we live, and have no, no long to give. And when these fingers can strum no longer, and the old banjo to young ones stronger.
Pete Seeger
Homemade soup delivery to the library

Homemade soup delivery to the library

Afghan women breaking cultural taboos. The bike as a tool for women’s empowerment. ~NPR

Afghan women breaking cultural taboos. The bike as a tool for women’s empowerment. ~NPR

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last “Angel” of Bataan and Corregidor
On December 8, 1941 (December 7 in Honolulu, Hawaii), 88 Army and 11 Navy nurses serving in the Philippines found themselves in the midst of the Japanese invasion of the Pacific. They flew into action assisting and comforting the wounded. 
After the surprise attack subsided and the U.S. and Filipino military fought the Japanese invaders they set up two main hospitals. The first was located in Bataan and was nothing more than a group of grass tents and sheds. The second was an open air hospital further inland that became a hotbed for malaria and dysentery.
Mildred Dalton had enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1939 having graduated from nursing school in Georgia a few years earlier. She was one of the 99 nurses stationed in the Philippines on that fateful day. What she and her peers experienced over the next four years would forever change them.
On April 8, 1942 the Army ordered the evacuation of Bataan including the nurses. They left 8,800 wounded in the hospital. The nurses would forever regret that decision especially since many of those men were killed immediately or during the infamous Bataan Death March.
Sent to Corregidor, the military set up the next hospital in the Malinta Tunnel. Poorly lit and poorly ventilated, the hospital would care for over 12,000 Army and Navy wounded.
As the Japanese army continued their drive through the Philippines thirty-four nurses were evacuated to Australia. Fifty-six were left in Corregidor and ten more were stranded on a nearby island after their transport plane crashed. On May 6, 1942 the military command at Corregidor surrendered and all the nurses became prisoners of war. (The ten stranded nurses were later captured by the Japanese and became POWs as well.) 
For the next three years these women would care for the wounded in various internment camps set up by the Japanese. Early on the women were treated well provided with decent food, golf lessons, and all the medical supplies they needed. As the war progressed, however, conditions deteriorated as the tide turned against the Japanese. 
In the winter of 1945 the nurses and their patients were all suffering from some level of malnutrition. Several were literally starving and suffering from the painful disease beriberi, caused by a severe vitamin B deficiency.  The women were living on 700 calories a day. They were finally saved in February 1945 when the 1st Calvary Division and 44th Tank Battalion liberated the camps.
The women became national heroes. Dubbed “angels” by the soldiers and sailors under their care, the nurses were awarded bronze stars, received a special message of thanks from Franklin Roosevelt, and were recruited for war bond drives.
Mildred Dalton met her future husband, Arthur Manning, a newspaper editor, on one of the bond drives. They would later move to Jacksonville, Florida where she continued to work as a nurse. 
Mrs. Manning could never forget her experience and suffered from lifelong symptoms of PTSD. After her husband died she moved to Trenton, New Jersey to be closer to one of her sons. She was easily spotted driving around town in her red Toyota Corrolla with her license plates which read EX POW RN. (Her children had to convince Mrs. Manning that it was OK to purchase a Japanese car.)
Mildred Dalton Manning passed away on March 8, 2013 at the age of 98. She was the last of the “Angels” according to Elizabeth Norman author of We Band of Angels.
Sources: NY Times, Soldiers magazine, and Allnurses.com
(Image of several of the “Angels of Bataan” as they are boarding a plane to leave the Philippines February 20, 1945. Courtesy of the U.S. Army Center of Military History via Soldiers magazine. I could not determine whether Mrs. Manning was in the photo.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last “Angel” of Bataan and Corregidor

On December 8, 1941 (December 7 in Honolulu, Hawaii), 88 Army and 11 Navy nurses serving in the Philippines found themselves in the midst of the Japanese invasion of the Pacific. They flew into action assisting and comforting the wounded. 

After the surprise attack subsided and the U.S. and Filipino military fought the Japanese invaders they set up two main hospitals. The first was located in Bataan and was nothing more than a group of grass tents and sheds. The second was an open air hospital further inland that became a hotbed for malaria and dysentery.

Mildred Dalton had enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1939 having graduated from nursing school in Georgia a few years earlier. She was one of the 99 nurses stationed in the Philippines on that fateful day. What she and her peers experienced over the next four years would forever change them.

On April 8, 1942 the Army ordered the evacuation of Bataan including the nurses. They left 8,800 wounded in the hospital. The nurses would forever regret that decision especially since many of those men were killed immediately or during the infamous Bataan Death March.

Sent to Corregidor, the military set up the next hospital in the Malinta Tunnel. Poorly lit and poorly ventilated, the hospital would care for over 12,000 Army and Navy wounded.

As the Japanese army continued their drive through the Philippines thirty-four nurses were evacuated to Australia. Fifty-six were left in Corregidor and ten more were stranded on a nearby island after their transport plane crashed. On May 6, 1942 the military command at Corregidor surrendered and all the nurses became prisoners of war. (The ten stranded nurses were later captured by the Japanese and became POWs as well.) 

For the next three years these women would care for the wounded in various internment camps set up by the Japanese. Early on the women were treated well provided with decent food, golf lessons, and all the medical supplies they needed. As the war progressed, however, conditions deteriorated as the tide turned against the Japanese. 

In the winter of 1945 the nurses and their patients were all suffering from some level of malnutrition. Several were literally starving and suffering from the painful disease beriberi, caused by a severe vitamin B deficiency.  The women were living on 700 calories a day. They were finally saved in February 1945 when the 1st Calvary Division and 44th Tank Battalion liberated the camps.

The women became national heroes. Dubbed “angels” by the soldiers and sailors under their care, the nurses were awarded bronze stars, received a special message of thanks from Franklin Roosevelt, and were recruited for war bond drives.

Mildred Dalton met her future husband, Arthur Manning, a newspaper editor, on one of the bond drives. They would later move to Jacksonville, Florida where she continued to work as a nurse. 

Mrs. Manning could never forget her experience and suffered from lifelong symptoms of PTSD. After her husband died she moved to Trenton, New Jersey to be closer to one of her sons. She was easily spotted driving around town in her red Toyota Corrolla with her license plates which read EX POW RN. (Her children had to convince Mrs. Manning that it was OK to purchase a Japanese car.)

Mildred Dalton Manning passed away on March 8, 2013 at the age of 98. She was the last of the “Angels” according to Elizabeth Norman author of We Band of Angels.

Sources: NY Times, Soldiers magazine, and Allnurses.com

(Image of several of the “Angels of Bataan” as they are boarding a plane to leave the Philippines February 20, 1945. Courtesy of the U.S. Army Center of Military History via Soldiers magazine. I could not determine whether Mrs. Manning was in the photo.)

Never try to maintain relations in your life. Just try to maintain life in your relations.
Voyager 1 launched in 1977 is an intergalactic time capsule of sorts. The goal of this satellite being to inform beings outside of our solar system of our culture. Whale songs, DNA diagram, kissing noises, and Johnny B. Goode included.

Voyager 1 launched in 1977 is an intergalactic time capsule of sorts. The goal of this satellite being to inform beings outside of our solar system of our culture. Whale songs, DNA diagram, kissing noises, and Johnny B. Goode included.

(Source: nyprarchives)

Magda

Magda

After the apocalypse - The Washington Post

Post apocalyptic dioramas created by Lori Nix

"And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it." - Paulo Coelho

(Source: stunningpicture)

Just a girl eager to learn who likes to sit on roofs and soothe her strawberry plant.